Mar 20, 2020

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Category: General
Posted by: annelise

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Singin With The Birds

TRACK LISTING

  1. Jacobin and Le Vaillant's
  2. Fish Eagle
  3. Green-Wood Hoopoe
  4. Crested Barbet
  5. Emerald - Spotted Wood Dove
  6. Verreaux's Giant Eagle Owl
  7. Red-Chested Cuckoo
  8. Bru Bru Skrike
  9. Woodland and Brown-hooded Kingfishers
  10. Chinspot Batis
  11. Secretary Bird
  12. Spotted Thick Knee
  13. Diederik Cuckoo
  14. Yellow-Fronted Tinker Bird
  15. Orange-breasted Bush-Shrike
  16. Grey Go-Away Bird
  17. Black-crowned Tchagra
  18. Pearl-spotted Owlet
  19. Klass' Cuckoo
  20. The Greater Honeyguide

Singin’ With The Birds…...a message from the composer.
This album is a collection of the songs only - from the 4 albums “Tales of the Bird Watchers” series, which comprises of 24 stories followed by songs. The stories with bush background sounds and bird calls describe a bird, its appearance, habits, habitat, history and a fable for the young set.
This song compilation makes for easy listening and having the whole collection of songs, which are hopefully both entertaining and informative, all on one album.
When I was at school I found that learning was made easier by little rhymes and songs like “Thirty days hath September”… As a pilot I found the easiest way to remember take off, landing and emergency checks were by acronyms and rhymes. (Even wrote a song called Checklist Blues for fellow aviators). Sailors and Boy Scouts have rhymes for tying knots (Leftover right and under….. and repairmen have rhymes when working with nuts and bolts “Leftie loosie, rightie tightie…”)
As an entertainer having performed for children interested in wildlife, at bird clubs, historians’ associations and at International Game Ranger Conferences, I found the best way to put my story across was to say it then sing it!
When my children and grandchildren became interested in wildlife, I found the easiest way for them to learn about birds was to start by getting them to listen to their calls. Again it was easier for them to learn by my writing songs about them incorporating the tempo, rhythm and melody of their calls as well as their characteristics, habits, habitats and appearance. I also would add an amusing story which would really hold their attention. Not only did I sometimes touch on historical facts of how birds got their names but also sneaked in mythical stories and underlying messages like “Never cry wolf” (Black Collard Barbet). “Life is beautiful (Black-crowned Tchagra). “Check your bike tyres” (Black-backed Puffback). “Watch where you walk” (Secretary Bird). “Don’t lose hope” (Emerald Spotted Wood Dove). “Healthy lifestyle” (Chinspot Batis).
I also reminded them that birds are also indicators of the weather (Red Chested, Le Vaillant's and Jacobin Cuckoos), danger (Grey Go away Bird) and where beehives are (Greater Honeyguide).
Birding boffins know much but children and beginners both young and old have enjoyed and learnt from my songs on CD and at “live” performances.
As Mark Twain once said, “If you want to be happy make someone else happy!” If my songs make you happy… I have succeeded.
Yours in Birding.
John Edmond.